Blog

Quaker Records

Birth, marriage and death records for the Society of Friends or Quakers are amongst the most accessible and systematic for any religious denomination in Ireland. The Quakers arrived in Ireland in the seventeenth century and from their date of arrival clear and concise records were kept for the life events of members of the Society.  Although the Quakers

Read More

Hayes Manuscript Sources

Hayes Manuscript Sources, or, Manuscript Sources for the History of Irish Civilization was created by the Director of the National Library of Ireland, Richard J. Hayes.  Started in 1941, the project to catalogue manuscript sources relevant to the history of Ireland was completed in 1965 with a supplement published in 1975. It is an extensive catalogue

Read More

Betham’s Sketch Pedigrees

In a previous blog, the work of Sir William Betham and his collection of Genealogical Abstracts held at the National Archives was discussed.  In conjunction with the Genealogical Abstracts, Betham compiled an extensive collection of sketch pedigrees.  In large part these pedigrees were sketched from the material extracted from the Betham’s abstracts

Read More

Betham’s Genealogical Abstracts

Sir William Betham (1779-1853) was appointed deputy Ulster King of Arms in 1807 and Ulster King of Arms in 1820.  Betham spent a lifetime collating indexes and abstracts of the manuscripts held in the Record Tower of Dublin Castle.  Although Betham was a polymath, it is his work in the Records Tower for which Irish genealogists and family historians

Read More

The Police Gazette or Hue-and-Cry Ireland

The Police Gazette or Hue-and-Cry Ireland was published in Dublin every Tuesday and Friday by Alexander Thom & Co., and is almost always referred to as Hue-and-Cry  It is unclear when Hue-and Cry and was first published in Ireland and exactly how much of the publication survives.  The National Library of Ireland’s holding runs from 1837 to 1917,

Read More

The Dublin Gazette & Iris Oifigiuil

The use of newspapers for the study of family history is well known.  However, the name of one of the oldest publications in Ireland, the Dublin Gazette, will be less familiar, despite its myriad of potential uses to the family historian. The Dublin Gazette was first published on 5th November 1706 and was the official publication of British Government

Read More

Griffith’s Valuation House Books

Griffith’s Valuation House Books are the notebooks that were used by valuators to record information on the majority of the buildings of Ireland, be it dwelling house, out-office or even lavatory in order to place a rateable value on the building and these records formed part of the information-gathering process required for the completion of the

Read More

Deceased Seamen

Civil Registration of deaths began in Ireland in 1864.  Unlike marriages, which were registered by the officiating priest or parish clerk, and births which could and were registered by anyone present at the event, deaths were often not registered.  It has been estimated that between 1864 and 1900 some 15% of births went unregistered.  The figure

Read More

A Note on Burial Registers

Roman Catholic Burial Registers are relatively uncommon in Ireland prior to the 1830s and those that do exist seldom offer more detail than the name of the deceased.  However, Burial Registers for Church of Ireland Parishes, where those records survived the fire at the Public Records in 1922, can be quite informative.  Standardised forms were introduced

Read More